Last edited by Gusho
Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Culture-bound syndromes found in the catalog.

The Culture-bound syndromes

folk illnesses of psychiatric and anthropological interest

  • 222 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by D. Reidel, Sold and distributed in the U.S.A. and Canada by Kluwer Academic Publishers in Dordrecht, Boston, Hingham, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medical anthropology.,
  • Ethnopsychology.,
  • Mental illness -- Social aspects.,
  • Psychiatry, Transcultural.,
  • Culture.,
  • Ethnic Groups -- psychology.,
  • Mental Disorders -- etiology.,
  • Social Environment.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    Statementedited by Ronald C. Simons and Charles C. Hughes.
    SeriesCulture, illness, and healing
    ContributionsSimons, Ronald C., Hughes, Charles C.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGN296 .C835 1985
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 516 p. ;
    Number of Pages516
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2533892M
    ISBN 10902771858X, 9027718598
    LC Control Number85014613

      As a result of the re-examination of the DSM-IV's glossary of culture-bound syndromes, three more precise and useful concepts have been included. The “boundedness” feature was drastically challenged as its implication of uniqueness has been weakened by migrations and the subsequent broadening of geo-demographic by: 8.   Culture-bound syndrome is a term used to describe the uniqueness of some syndromes in specific cultures. Dhat (semen-loss anxiety) has been considered to Cited by:

    Culture-Bound Syndromes Culture-bound syndromes, also known as culture-specific syndromes, have been defined as “clusters of symptoms more common in some cultures than in other cultural groups” (LaVeist & Thomas, , p. ).   Culture-Bound Syndromes By: Central Arkansas University Table of Contents Abstract Pg. 3 Introduction Pg. 4 - 8 Methodology Pg. 8 - 10 Analysis & Discussion Pg. 10 - 11 Conclusion & Recommendations Pg. 13 Bibliography Pg. 14 Abstract Mental Health as described by LaVeist and Thomas () is “a state of successful performance of mental function, resulting in productive .

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Culture, Illness and Healing: Culture-Bound Syndromes 7 (, Paperback) at the best online prices at . The book covers many topics including animism, shamanism, totemism, hunting and cultivation rituals, altered states of consciousness, envy and the evil eye, how people deal with conflicts, potlatches, cargo cults, how people satisfy the need for social approval, culture-bound syndromes, folk medicine, treatment of women, raising of children.


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The Culture-bound syndromes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Product details Series: Culture, Illness and Healing (Book 7) Hardcover: pages Publisher: Springer; edition (Septem ) Language: English ISBN X ISBN Product Dimensions: x x inches Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and 5/5(1). Culture-Bound Syndromes, Ethnopsychiatry, and Alternate Therapies (Mental Health research in Asia and the Pacific, Vol.

4) Hardcover – January 1, by William Lebra (Editor)Format: Hardcover. It also provides the best-to-date discussions of the difficulties of fitting the culture-bound syndromes into present nosological categories.

The book has the notable advantage of the firm editorship of a psychiatrist and an anthropologist, both of whom have full familiarity with the other's : $   In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes.

A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry/5(4).

Armando R. Favazza `This book provides detailed descriptions and discussions of several of the most important of these syndromes. It also provides the best-to-date discussions of the difficulties of fitting the culture-bound syndromes into present nosological categories.

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Textbook of Cultural Psychiatry. 2nd edition Edited by Dinesh Bhugra, Kamaldeep Bhui; In Culture-Bound Syndromes: Folk Illnesses of Psychiatric and Anthropological Interest.

In theory, culture-bound syndromes are those folk illnesses in which alterations of behavior and experience figure prominently. In actuality, however, many are not syndromes at all. Instead, they are local ways of explaining any of a wide assortment of Size: KB. In theory, culture-bound syndromes are those folk illnesses in which alterations of behavior and experience figure prominently.

In actuality, however, many are not syndromes at all. Instead, they are local ways of explaining any of a wide assortment of by: 8. Culture-Bound Syndromes. dissociative episodes, outbursts of violent and aggressive or homicidal behavior directed at people and objects, persecutory ideas, amnesia, exhaustion.

afflicted person becomes flustered and may say and do things that appear amusing, such as mimicking people's words and movements.

A culture-bound syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms that is restricted to a limited number of cultures by reason of certain psychosocial features. Culture-bound syndromes are usually restricted to a specific setting, and they have a special relationship to that setting.

In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry.

In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry.

In a review of the. The term culture-bound syndrome denotes recurrent, locality-specific patterns of aberrant behavior and troubling experience that may or may not be linked to a particular DSM-IV diagnostic category.

Many of these patterns are indigenously considered to be "illnesses," or. The Psychiatric Times  defines culture bound syndromes as being “ local ways of explaining any of a wide assortment of misfortunes ” and by saying “ in a cultural setting in which there is a particular folk illness, both the experience and the behaviors of the ill person will be shaped by that patient’s understanding of that illness “.

The first disorder, taijin kyofusho, is a culture-bound social anxiety disorder that has been documented in Japan since the s. It is characterized by the experience of anxiety in, and often avoidance of, social and interpersonal situations for fear ofFile Size: KB.

Culture-bound syndromes provide a useful mirror for Western mental health professionals to examine their assumptions about the nature, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders. The DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, ) defines and states. Culture-bound disorders may involve somatic expressions (e.g., temporary loss of consciousness or involuntarily clenched teeth), cognitions (e.g., a belief that one’s genitals are retracting into the body or a conviction that one has been abducted by extraterrestrial beings), or behaviors (e.g., extreme startle responses, coprophagia, or.

It is this last point that can make discussion of culture-bound syndromes so difficult. A diagnosis such as Gender Identity Disorder or MPD/DID can be a comfort to people in deep distress, and it may seem callous to undermine their efforts to define their suffering on their own terms.

In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry.

In a review of the literature on culture-bound syndromes up to Yap made certain suggestions for organizing thinking. A person suffering from Taijin Kyofusho are likely to be extremely embarrassed of themselves or displeasing to others when it comes to the functions of their bodies or appearances.

This culture-bound syndrome is a social phobia dealing with social anxiety. Culture-bound syndrome (CBS) is a broad rubric that encompasses certain behavioral, affective and cognitive manifestations seen in specific cultures.

As per diagnostic and statistical manual for mental disorders - IV(DSM IV) (appendix I, p. ), they denote recurrent, locality-specific patterns of aberrant behavior and troubling experience that may or may not be linked to a particular DSM-IV diagnostic .In the glossary of our book The Culture-Bound Syndromes, Charles C.

Hughes, Ph.D., listed almost folk illnesses that have, at one time or another, been considered culture-bound syndromes (Simons and Hughes, ). Many have wonderfully exotic and evocative names: Arctic hysteria, amok, brain fag, Cited by: 8.

Culture‐bound Syndromes in the Diagnostic Manuals (DSM and ICD) As mentioned earlier, the rise of culture‐bound syndromes may be a reflection of the rise of Western diagnostic and classificatory systems and also the long‐standing impact of colonialism.

Recent shifts in the DSM‐5 1 may indicate a change away from these factors. The two Cited by: